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Cat Eye Cancer

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[[Category:Cat Health]]
[[Category:Cat Health]]
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== Cat Cancer (Feline Cancer) ==
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== Cat Eye Cancer ==
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<div class="gwo_image" style="float:right;">[http://www.petwellbeing.com/products/cat-cancer http://pethealth.petwellbeing.com/w/images/3/34/Cat_cancer_btn.gif]</div>
 
Eye tumors can develop in several different places of this vital sensory organ in cats. These growths can impair the cat's ability to see, and can become dangerous to their health if they begin to affect the cat’s central nervous system. Common types of eye tumors and [[Cat Cancer]] in these cats are found on the eyelid, with the most common for cats being known as a [[Cat Squamous Cell Carcinoma]]. This mass begins as a small spot on an eyelid, and then continually begins to grow larger and thicker in size. The most common for cats is the meibomian gland adenoma and papilloma.
Eye tumors can develop in several different places of this vital sensory organ in cats. These growths can impair the cat's ability to see, and can become dangerous to their health if they begin to affect the cat’s central nervous system. Common types of eye tumors and [[Cat Cancer]] in these cats are found on the eyelid, with the most common for cats being known as a [[Cat Squamous Cell Carcinoma]]. This mass begins as a small spot on an eyelid, and then continually begins to grow larger and thicker in size. The most common for cats is the meibomian gland adenoma and papilloma.
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Most of the eyelid tumors that affect cats are malignant, which makes their prognosis worse than it is with dogs. Though the masses tend to be locally invasive, their chances of spreading are usually very slim. Smaller tumors come with a better prognosis, especially when they are completely removed with surgery. It is important that cats are monitored every few months, as eyelid tumors are prone to returning in the future.
Most of the eyelid tumors that affect cats are malignant, which makes their prognosis worse than it is with dogs. Though the masses tend to be locally invasive, their chances of spreading are usually very slim. Smaller tumors come with a better prognosis, especially when they are completely removed with surgery. It is important that cats are monitored every few months, as eyelid tumors are prone to returning in the future.
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== Additional Cat Cancer Pages ==
== Additional Cat Cancer Pages ==
[[Cat Cancer]] | [[Cat Skin Cancer]] | [[Cat Lung Cancer]] | [[Cat Pancreatic Cancer]] | [[Cat Cancer Prevention]] | [[Cat Cancer Diagnosis]] | [[Cat Gastric Cancer]] | [[Cat Lymphoma Cancer]] [[Cat Squamous Cell Carcinoma]] | [[Cat Mouth Cancer]] | [[Cat Brain Tumor]]
[[Cat Cancer]] | [[Cat Skin Cancer]] | [[Cat Lung Cancer]] | [[Cat Pancreatic Cancer]] | [[Cat Cancer Prevention]] | [[Cat Cancer Diagnosis]] | [[Cat Gastric Cancer]] | [[Cat Lymphoma Cancer]] [[Cat Squamous Cell Carcinoma]] | [[Cat Mouth Cancer]] | [[Cat Brain Tumor]]

Latest revision as of 22:35, April 1, 2014

Cat Eye Cancer

Eye tumors can develop in several different places of this vital sensory organ in cats. These growths can impair the cat's ability to see, and can become dangerous to their health if they begin to affect the cat’s central nervous system. Common types of eye tumors and Cat Cancer in these cats are found on the eyelid, with the most common for cats being known as a Cat Squamous Cell Carcinoma. This mass begins as a small spot on an eyelid, and then continually begins to grow larger and thicker in size. The most common for cats is the meibomian gland adenoma and papilloma.

Signs and Symptoms

The typical sign of an eyelid tumor in all breeds of cats is a mass that starts out small and continues to grow. The tumor may also have a discharge or may become ulcerated over time. In cats, it is often dismissed as possibly Cat Pink Eye.

Diagnosis

The mass must be biopsied and tested in order to make a diagnosis. Other common tests that may be performed to determine the extent of the disease and the cat's overall health are x-rays of the head, eye ultrasounds, MRI, and lymph node cytology. Seeing a reputable Veterinarian that specializes in these types of diagnosis techniques is highly suggested. A second opinion would help to determine if it is indeed a cancerous growth.

Treatment for Eyelid Tumors

Surgery is generally the most recommended options for treating eyelid tumors in both cats. The mass needs to be removed as soon as possible to help save the cat's vision. The size of the tumor will determine the type of surgery performed. Large masses that cover over one half of the eyelid may need to be removed with reconstructive surgical methods. Cryosurgery is used if the tumor is able to be removed with this method. It tends to be less invasive, and can be performed no almost all cats without regards to their age.

Cat Cancer Chemotherapy and radiation are other forms of treatment that may be used. Overall, the determining factors for treatment include the size, location, grade, and type of the tumor, as well as the life expectancy of the cat.

Prognosis

Most of the eyelid tumors that affect cats are malignant, which makes their prognosis worse than it is with dogs. Though the masses tend to be locally invasive, their chances of spreading are usually very slim. Smaller tumors come with a better prognosis, especially when they are completely removed with surgery. It is important that cats are monitored every few months, as eyelid tumors are prone to returning in the future.


Additional Cat Cancer Pages

Cat Cancer | Cat Skin Cancer | Cat Lung Cancer | Cat Pancreatic Cancer | Cat Cancer Prevention | Cat Cancer Diagnosis | Cat Gastric Cancer | Cat Lymphoma Cancer Cat Squamous Cell Carcinoma | Cat Mouth Cancer | Cat Brain Tumor

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