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Cardigan Welsh Corgi

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(New page: == Physical Characteristics == Image:CardiganWelshCorgi.jpg '''Breed Group:''' Herding '''Weight:''' The average male Cardigan Welsh Corgi is around 30 to 38 pounds (13.6 to 17...)
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== Physical Characteristics ==
== Physical Characteristics ==
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== Breeders ==
== Breeders ==
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No breeders listed at this time.
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[[List of dog breeds]]
[[List of dog breeds]]
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[[Category:Dog Breeds]]

Latest revision as of 23:04, December 21, 2007

Contents

Physical Characteristics

CardiganWelshCorgi.jpg


Breed Group:

Herding


Weight:

The average male Cardigan Welsh Corgi is around 30 to 38 pounds (13.6 to 17.2 kg), and an average female is around 25 to 34 pounds (11.3 to 15.4 kg).


Height:

Cardigan Welsh Corgis are on average 10.5 to 12.5 inches tall (26 – 32 cm).


Color(s):

Cardigan Welsh Corgis can be red, sable, black, blue merle, or brindled.


Coat:

A Cardigan’s coat is of medium length and is weather-resistant. It is easy to maintain as it only requires routine grooming with a firm brush.


Overview

Character:

It is best to think of the Cardigan Welsh Corgi as a big dog who happens to have shorter legs. They may be small in stature, but they have a big dog’s energy level and personality. Originally bred as herding dogs, they are a robust and active breed praised for their affectionate nature, which makes them great companions, working dogs, and house pets.


Country of Origin:

Wales


History:

Believed to have descended from the same family as the Dachshund, another breed known for their diminished stature, the original Cardigan Welsh Corgis were brought to Wales over 3,000 years ago by ancient Celtic tribes as herding dogs for sheep and cattle. They were later crossed with dogs from the Spitz family to produce the modern Cardigans. Today they are still used as sheep and cattle dogs in some regions.

Cardigan Welsh Corgis and Pembroke Welsh Corgis are often collectively known as “Welsh Corgis;” indeed, they were not officially recognized as separate breeds until 1934. Cardigans have longer tails, unlike the Pembroke’s bobbed nubs; as well, Cardigans are bigger, have deeper chests, and have a more athletic build than Pembrokes.


Name:

In Welsh, “Cor gi” can be translated to “dwarf dog.” Cardigan refers to Cardiganshire, Wales, the geographic area where this breed of corgis originated.


Temperament:

Cardigan Welsh Corgis are active, playful dogs. Their herding instinct gives them an involved, lively personality that is similar to a Collie or a German Shepherd. They do well around other dogs and children, as they always enjoy the attention from extra playmates. Highly intelligent and affectionate, Cardigan Welsh Corgis are very devoted to their families and make perfect companion dogs.


Care

Training:

Like other herding breeds, Cardigan Welsh Corgis respond very well to obedience training. Their willingness to please their masters makes them quick learners, and since their energy level is so high they seem to always enjoy the extra attention. Plenty of external stimuli are needed to keep these active dogs occupied, or they may resort to destroying furniture to relieve the boredom.


Activity:

People are sometimes fooled by the Cardigan Welsh Corgi’s small size, and are surprised by their athletic abilities. Remember, they are herding dogs after all! While daily marathons may be a little excessive, they would certainly enjoy long walks and plenty of space to play around.


Ownership:

Both of the Welsh Corgi breeds are becoming more and more popular with pet lovers, and for good reasons too. They are lovable, loyal companions, and thrive in many different environments. Their size makes them suitable as apartment dogs, provided that they have adequate space for exercise. As a rule, it is best to discourage puppies from jumping down furniture or going down staircases, since these long-bodied dogs can develop back problems later on in life.


Breeders

No breeders listed at this time.


List of dog breeds

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